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Churchill’s Funeral: The End of Empire by Patrick Bishop

On 30 January 1965, the world said farewell to Sir Winston Churchill in a ceremony of the grandest scale, full of pageantry, pomp and grandeur; a historical event to honour a man who had shaped history. But Britain was saying goodbye to an era, as well as a leader. The empire was deteriorating, and with it went the confidence, power, wealth and cultural certainties that underpinned it. Would Churchill recognise the...
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The Warbirds by Richard Herman

Dealing with a company of poorly trained misfits, Colonel Anthony “Muddy” Waters is sent on a mission that no other officer in the US Air Force would touch. Stubborn and dedicated, Waters turns a superbly talented pilot but loose cannon named Jack Locke into a fighting force to be reckoned with. When the heavens explode, they’ll have to fly their F-4’s into the eye of the firestorm, face an overwhelming...
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The Marlboroughs by Christopher Hibbert

  John and Sarah Churchill, the Duke and Duchess of Marlborough, were the most influential and gifted couple in eighteenth-century England. John Churchill proved himself to be not only the greatest military commander of his time — his bravery and skill were legendary — but also a masterful diplomat in the service of both King William III and later Queen Anne. His wife Sarah was no less a charismatic figure....
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The Forgotten Few by Adam Zamoyski

  The crucial role played by Polish airmen during the Second World War and the colourful stories of their adventures have become part of British folklore. But very few people have any idea of the extent of their involvement, or how they came to be in Britain. In this brilliant history, Adam Zamoyski explores the unwavering courage of Polish fighters and how they helped to defeat the Nazis. This book...
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Dark Quartet by Lynne Reid Banks

  The Bronte sisters - Charlotte, Emily and Anne - are some of the best-known, and best-loved, English authors. But less well-known were the two other Bronte sisters, Maria and Elizabeth, who died before reaching adulthood, and their brother Branwell, who was haunted by his own demons until his death in his thirties. After the death of Maria and Elizabeth, the four remaining children returned to its cheerless rooms and...
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The Spencer Family by Charles Spencer

  Tracing the history of the Spencers from their beginnings as medieval sheep farmers, through centuries of service to country and crown to their high public profile following the marriage of Diana Spencer to the Prince of Wales, Charles, Ninth Earl Spencer, has written a superb and engaging work of family history. Hugely enriched by his unique access to private papers and family memories, it details the lives of such...
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The Secret Generations

May, 1910 The world is on the eve of a war set to ruin the lives of a whole generation. The Railton family are intimately involved in the world of espionage, which will become so crucial to the conflict’s outcome. With the death of General Sir William Railton, the family patriarch and hero of Balaclava, the family is thrown into a world of violence and intrigue. ‘A Schnapps and champagne...
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Ocean Strike by Damien Lewis

December. Most of the world is preparing for Christmas.But a small fanatical group of lethal terrorists are preparing for something very different - the most devastating terror attack the world has ever witnessed. The target. Britain. 
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Our Latest Titles

The Architect of Murder by Rafe McGregor

As the twentieth century begins and a new monarch is crowned, the life of a...
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The Followers by Christopher Nicole

When Detective Sergeant Jessica Jones of the Special Branch Protection Unit is commanded by her...
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Deceived by Peter Taylor

Would you ever cross the line? Two law students at Teesside University didn’t think so,...
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The Aelian Fragment by George Bartram

Samuel Teck arrived in the ancient city of Izmir as an innocent American Professor abroad....
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Eve’s Daughter by Jeanne Whitmee

Be careful what you wish for... Eve and Jack Kenning have longed desperately for a...
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The Circumstantial Enemy by John R. Bell

On the wrong side of war, there is more than one enemy… When Croatia becomes...
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Terror at Sea by Douglas Stewart

Piracy. Although often associated with the antiquated figures of picture books and blockbuster films, modern-day...
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Venom by Alan Scholefield

Midwinter in London's plush Eaton Square, and Philip, a sickly ten-year-old boy is left in...
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Vatican Vendetta by Peter Watson

The road to hell is paved with good intentions… Behind the scenes at the Vatican,...
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Walking Shadows by David Barry

Who do you trust when you can’t trust family? Three months after her wedding day,...
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Montgomery: Hero or Villain? by Gordon Corrigan

In the annals of British history the name Montgomery is legend. During the Second World...
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Bad Faces by Charles Hall

A man is the sole witness to a fatal accident. Thugs warn him against testifying;...
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Yes Giorgio by Anne Piper

Could anybody be more prosaic, less romantic, less gallant and more constant than a solid...
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Trigger by Antony Melville Ross

Deep beneath the placid Mediterranean, the submarine TRIGGER stalks the enemy convoys... Lieutenant Peter Harding...
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Murder Begets Murder by Roderic Jeffries

The English community on Mallorca were sorry for William Heron. The reclusive, wealthy invalid had...
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Cruel Necessity by Oliver Woodman

England. 1600s. As the first of the battles of the English Civil War subside, the...
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Rough Diamonds by Graham Ison

Tommy Fox is back… The shooting of a man in a taxi at Hyde Park...
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Smoke Without Fire by Leo McNeir

A new man comes to live in Knightly St John. He is old, he is...
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Before the Storm by Robert Jackson

This is the story of the difficult, dangerous early years of Bomber Command’s war: a...
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The Blind Beak by Ernest Dudley

It is Eighteenth-century London and criminals are rife throughout the city. The Blind Magistrate, Sir...
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Earl of Shadows by Jacqueline Reiter

Two brothers are locked in a life-long struggle to fulfil their destinies. John and William...
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The Wardrobe by Deryn Lake

‘With history this colourful and a mystery this baffling, the result is delicious’ –Good Book...
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The Voyage by Christopher Nicole

The voyage of a lifetime was not what Detective Sergeant Jessica Jones was expecting when...
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Neither Angels Nor Demons by Pamela Pope

It is 1869 and Hannah Jerram plays a devious trick on her brother, Luke, whilst...
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The Prince of Eden by Marilyn Harris

A tale of two brothers… Edward Eden may be rich, but he is also the...
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Jack Tars and Commodores by William M. Fowler

Jack Tars and Commodores is a lively and authoritative account of the United States Navy...
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The Quiet Rebel by Desiree Meyler

Yorkshire, 1914. Clara Howdale lives a subservient life underneath her father, a rich and stubborn...
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A Shape on the Air by Julia Ibbotson

Julia Ibbotson discusses the themes and inspirations behind her new book, A Shape on the Air.  Why do we experience that feeling of ‘deja vu’? How come we sometimes feel that an old house still bears the imprints of past inhabitants? I’m not talking about ‘ghosts’ or anything specific or corporeal, but what I have called in my latest novel  ‘shapes on the air’. The idea for A Shape on the Air had been brewing in my mind for a long time. I had been reading about, and mulling over,  the notion of time slip and especially the concept of ‘worm-holes’ and the Einstein-Bridge theory of portals into other dimensions of time and space, in effect quantum mechanics. It sounds fanciful and Dr Who-ish, and oddly I’m not a great fan of fantasy, but I felt that this was in fact a more ‘logical’ (in some ways!) and scientific explanation of […]

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HRF Keating’s Undiscovered Novel

Sheila Mitchell, on behalf of the HRF Keating Estate, tell us about his newly discovered novel and the estate’s pleasure with Endeavour Ink’s plans to publish the novel for the first time.  Endeavour will always be associated with intrepid Arctic exploration and maverick Oxford cops but now the publishing house of that name is also making history. It is, with great courage, embarked on flying in the face of modern trends. Having conquered the digital world with their eBook list they are daring to revitalize the print world. With a list of established names to launch this ’endeavour’ they are giving authors new hope.

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Endeavour Ink signs Beryl Kingston’s new novel

Endeavour Ink is delighted to announce that we will be publishing Everybody’s Somebody by Beryl Kingston.  Beryl Kingston is a prolific bestselling author. Her first book was published in 1985 and was an instant bestseller. Her novels include family sagas Hearts and Farthings and its sequel Kisses and Ha’pennies, contemporary fiction such as Laura’s Way and Maggie’s Boy and historical novels like the upcoming Everybody’s Somebody.  The novel tells the story of the life of Rosie Goodison, born at the beginning of the twentieth-century, through WW1 and WW2, the social upheavals of Suffragism and the rise of Fascism, and her life as a mother and a woman in this tumultuous time. It’s a tough life, but she’s had to grow up young and learn to become a survivor.

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Something To Be Brave For by Priscilla Bennett

I was born and raised in a loving family in South Boston. Both my parents needed to work to support their four daughters. My mother was an operating room nurse, and my father had his own plumbing business. He used to joke that they were doing the same thing—rewiring the plumbing—only from a different perspective. “Laughter is the best medicine,” my mother would say, and often it filled our rooms and never was a voice raised. They respected each other. “Whatever your mother says goes. She knows best,” and every Friday night after work, he brought home a dozen red roses for her and arranged them in a cut glass vase before all of us sat down at the table for dinner. I was the eldest, and from an early age, I wanted to be a nurse just like my mother. “There’s no nobler profession,” she would say in between […]

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The launch of Endeavour Ink

On the evening of March 15th Endeavour Press officially launched its new print division, Endeavour Ink, with a party at Waterstone’s Piccadilly. Endeavour Ink is the latest chapter on the story of Endeavour Press. Our aim is to publish a select number of books, in print and ebook, by bestselling authors, writing both fiction and non-fiction. We have already commissioned a number of projects from new authors and writers on the Endeavour Press list: J D Davies and Richard Woodman will be writing a Tudor naval series and a book on William Marshall respectively; Alison Joseph will be writing a new crime series; David Boyle will be writing a thriller set around Bletchley Park; Michael Arnold will be writing a series of historical novels about Thomas Becket; Sarah Gristwood, Michael Jecks and Imogen Robertson will be writing historical novels.  We are also delighted to announce that we have signed two never-before-published novels from acclaimed authors, […]

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No Ordinary Killing and The Boer War by Jeff Dawson

A few years ago I lived on a street called Ladysmith Road. It joined another one called Kimberley, both thoroughfares of solid, red-brick terracing. Show me any British suburb, built around 1900, and I will give you roads called Ladysmith and Kimberley, Mafeking too — named after towns besieged, then jubilantly relieved, during the Boer War of 1899-1902. There’s evidence enough that the Boer War was deeply etched into late-Victorian/early-Edwardian society. The reminders live on elsewhere — in those steep “Kop” ends at football grounds; in the good old Boy Scouts, set up by a general (Baden-Powell) to inspire and improve army recruiting. At the war’s peak, a staggering half a million men — half a million — had flooded into South Africa from around the Empire, the then-biggest military expedition in history. It was the Vietnam War of its day, in which the might of the world’s pre-eminent Superpower […]

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