Jack Tars and Commodores by William M. Fowler

Jack Tars and Commodores is a lively and authoritative account of the United States Navy from Independence through the War of 1812.

During this turbulent period the new American republic fought three wars — declared and undeclared — against the Barbary States, France, and Great Britain. The first two were entirely naval affairs; the third, a combination of military action on land and sea. In each the survival of the young nation was due in large part to the efforts of the navy and the exploits of such men as Stephen Decatur, Isaac Hull, Thomas Truxtun, and Oliver Hazard Perry.

William Fowler is a historian with the capacity to convert meticulous research into flowing narrative. Here he fuses political and naval history, looking at political forces in the rapidly expanding U.S. society as well as at naval ordnance, operations, and the fateful and exciting battles at sea. He deals too with the often neglected human aspects of life aboard ship, focusing on those who served in the forecastle as well as the great men of the quarterdeck.

About the author…

William M. Fowler, Jr., is a professor of history at Northeastern University in Boston and managing editor of the New England Quarterly. Among his previous books are Rebels Under Sail, a dramatic account of the American navy during the Revolution, and The Baron of Beacon Hill, a biography of John Hancock. Professor Fowler and his family live in Reading, Massachusetts.

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Posted in History Endeavours.